Written by admin on Jul 5th, 2013 in Past Projects

revisited-2-1

Thanks to the Office of Tourism of the City of Kingston, in the summer of 2011 the committee relocated a part of its previous exhibit,  Rondout Revisited c. 1914, to the second floor gallery of the Downtown Heritage Area Visitor’s Center.  Taking advantage of the new space, the exhibit was expanded to present an overview of Rondout’s history from 1820, the decade which saw the opening of the Delaware & Hudson Canal and the introduction of steam travel on the river, to 1970 and the conclusion of the demolition associated with urban renewal.  The new exhibit was simply titled Rondout Revisited.

In the spring of 2012, Ulster County Tourism took over the space occupied by the exhibit for new offices, but thanks to the Ulster County Clerk and the Director of Ulster CountyTourism,  the exhibit found a new home at the Matthewis Persen House, on the corner of John and Crown Streets in Uptown Kingston.   The exhibit was open for the 2012 season in conjunction with the celebration of Ulster County Heritage Week, and will be open to the public once again in 2013.

Model of Kingston Landing, c. 1820, by Michael DelPriore, Ryerson Studio, Kingston, NY

Model of Kingston Landing, c. 1820, by Michael DelPriore, Ryerson Studio, Kingston, NY

Rondout Revisited is intended as a permanent exhibit that will orient visitors to the vibrant commercial center and transportation hub that Rondout once was.  It will eventually be installed in the Reher Bakery when the restoration and adaptation of the space is complete.

The first section of the exhibit, Circa 1820, describes Rondout when it was still Kingston Landing, a small community comprised of a handful of farms and stores and several docks to accommodate the river trade.  This section of the exhibit features a diorama of Kingston Landing by Michael DelPriore of Ryerson Studio, Kingston, NY, based on a map of Kingston Landing, c.1814, on file with the Ulster County Clerk.

Broadway and Mill Street looking south down Broadway to the Cornell Building, c. 1907.  Reher Center Collection

Broadway and Mill Street looking south down Broadway to the Cornell Building, c. 1907. Reher Center Collection

The second section, Circa 1914, captures Rondout in the years after the closing of the Delaware & Hudson Canal, during which time it continued to thrive as a commercial center and transportation hub.  This section features maps detailing every merchant along Broadway and East Strand that year, along with photographs of 16 shop interiors, from the collections of the Friends of Historic Kingston, John Matthews and the Reher Center.

The third section, The Urban Renewal Years, documents Rondout during the 1960s, when it was in serious decline.  This section of the exhibit is based around the photographs of Robert Haines and Eugene Dauner, with text by freelance journalist Lynn Woods.  As a photographer for the Daily Freeman, now retired, Mr. Haines chronicled the course of urban renewal in Rondout throughout the process.  Mr. Dauner, who grew up across the Rondout Creek in Port Ewen, combined his love for old Rondout with his interest in photography to create a rich and poignant record of this period in Rondout’s past.  Ms. Woods is actively researching the period in city records.

For the opening at the Matthewis Persen House, both Gene Dauner and Jack Matthews presented slide shows of photographs from their substantial collections not included in the exhibit.

Intersection of E. Strand and Hasbrouck Avenue seen from Ferry Street and Hasbrouck, c. 1965.  Photograph by Bob Haines

Intersection of E. Strand and Hasbrouck Avenue seen from Ferry Street and Hasbrouck, c. 1965. Photograph by Bob Haines

Corner of Mill Street and Broadway, c. 1965.  Photograph by Gene Dauner

Corner of Mill Street and Broadway, c. 1965. Photograph by Gene Dauner

Curator: Geoffrey Miller
Artistic Director: Susan Basch
Technical Assistance: William Sterling

Sponsors:

sponsors

EmailShare