The Reher Center for Immigrant Culture and History opened its new gallery space in 2018. Our gallery is the only space in Kingston devoted to the history of the Rondout neighborhood and the immigrant stories of the Hudson Valley, past and present.

Summer 2019 exhibits were made possible thanks to significant support from the Louis Greenspan Charitable Trust, Humanities New York, our Founders Circle, and an anonymous donor.

Hours: Open Saturdays 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sundays by Appointment.

Showing through September
Bajo la Misma Luna (Under the Same Moon)

Artworks reflecting on the personal journeys of participants in Adelante, a program hosted by Vassar College that guides undocumented youth in New York towards their futures. This exhibition was curated by Roberto Muller and Susie Ximenez of LatinX, who taught students to use "engagement in creative action."

Two Views? /¿Dos Vistas?

July 6th – September 1st, 2019
Reception: Saturday, August 3rd, 7 p.m.
Gallery Talk by artists Jose Acosta and Barry Mayo at 7 p.m.

Co-curators: Elinor Levy (ArtsMidhudson), Susie Ximenez (LatinX)

Two Views? /¿Dos Vistas?, part of Arts Mid Hudson’s multi-site project, The Spaces Between, features the work of two artists exploring the social spaces of marginalized status in American culture. Barry Mayo’s portraits capture both the intimacies and chasms unique to interracial families, while Jose Acosta’s paintings feature the hope and tribulation of immigration. Both artists’ “between” stories kick off a series of multi-media public programs hosted at the Reher Center Gallery that will run through September. The full schedule is available on our Events page.

Still from Barry Mayo's "Confessions of a Quadroon"
"Patriot" by Jose Acosta

The three-month city-wide series of exhibitions and programming will invite the communities of Kingston and the greater Hudson Valley to explore the social spaces of marginalized status in American culture. The Spaces Between challenges traditional views of "marginalized status" by considering the many ways people can be marginalized, including the undocumented community, the LGTBQ community, and the immigrant community through an exploration of statuses related to race, gender, and sexual identity. Utilizing music, art, poetry, food, storytelling, and discussion, we will investigate what these spaces look like and how we live within and negotiate between these spaces, as well as the normalized statuses that marginalized communities simultaneously reject and desire.

Upcoming Exhibit

Core Exhibit

Rondout Revisited

This three-part permanent exhibit documents the arc of an American river port and its diverse community over 150 years by focusing on changes to Broadway, Rondout's central commercial strip.

Curated by Geoff Miller and Susan Basch

Accompanying text by Lynn Woods

Circa 1820 describes Rondout when it was still Kingston Landing, a small community comprised of a handful of farms and stores and several docks to accommodate the river trade. Image courtesy Friends of Historic Kingston.

Circa 1914 captures Rondout in the years after the closing of the Delaware & Hudson Canal, during which time it continued to thrive as a commercial center and transportation hub. Photos courtesy Friends of Historic Kingston.

The Urban Renewal Years documents Rondout during the 1960s, when it was in serious decline and the neighborhood east of Broadway was demolished. This section of the exhibit is based around the photographs of Robert Haines and Eugene Dauner, with text by freelance journalist Lynn Woods.

Past Exhibits

Immigrant Stories & Refuge or Refusal - 2019
Life Above the Store - 2018
The Story Continues - 2018